Community Graphic

Shelter & Housing

The solution to homelessness seems simple – provide housing.  Unfortunately, not everyone is ready to be housed.  Instead, many need shelter while they deal with the issues that caused the situation of homelessness in the first place.  Others need a safe space to stay while they transition to independence.  Almost all need supportive services as they learn to make it on their own.  In order to ensure the greatest success in permanent housing, the Community Kitchen offers the following resources:

The Family Housing and Learning Center (FHLC):  A ten unit onsite apartment complex available to families ready to leave the shelter system but not yet ready for independence. IMG_0621 Adults in families must be employed full time for 4 weeks previous to program entry.  Once in the program, families work with case managers to complete goals they establish at entry; the maximum stay is 2 years.  The ultimate goal is home-ownership.  Residents learn to manage money by maintaining a savings account and paying a minimal rent (up to $300/month including utilities); upon graduation, 75% of any rent paid is refunded to the family to assist with permanent housing expenses.  Approximately 20 families complete the program each year.

Volunteers are needed for grounds maintenance, to tutor children, to teach life-skills classes, and to assist with apartment repairs and furnishings.

IMG_0609

The Maclellan Shelter for Families offers short-term emergency shelter to as many as 13 families with children at a time. Each room has a private bath with access to laundry facilities, dedicated case management support, and the Kitchen’s comprehensive programs serving the homeless.

The House of All Souls:  The House of All Souls is a nine bedroom home especially designed to be a quiet, peaceful, and loving home for chronically homeless men with disabilities.  Each resident has a private bedroom. There are several large common areas within the home, including a den with a fireplace and a library area as well as a laundry room on both floors.

Museum Street:  Museum Street exists in two separate houses; each house has four bedrooms with private bathrooms and a common living room.  One house is for homeless women with disabilities, the other house provides housing for homeless men with disabilities.

This project was made possible in part by funds provided by Fed Home Loan Bank and the City of Chattanooga’s Department of Neighborhood Services and Community Development; Andy Berke, Mayor.
equal-housing-logo

Saint Matthew’s Shelter for Men:  Saint Matthew’s Men’s Shelter offers nightly beds to as many as ten men at a time.  Residents of the shelter are involved in programs (such as the Homeless Health Care Center’s VIP drug and alcohol program or the Kitchen’s HELP II employment program) and are referred by case managers.  The shelter is open nightly from 5:30pm until 6:30am the following morning.  Adult men are needed to volunteer as overnight hosts (staff support is provided).  The shelter is located in the basement of a downtown church.

Saint Catherine’s Shelter for Women and Children:  Saint Catherine’s is the sister shelter to Saint Matthew’s and offers 8 nightly beds to women and their young children while they participate in self-sufficiency programs.  Adult women are needed to volunteer as overnight hosts (staff support is provided).  This shelter is also located in a downtown church proximate to Saint Matthew’s.